The CCA supports numerous arts-related events and projects each year.. Documentation from grant-supported projects completed and presented, artist award presentations, and CCA-initiated projects are archived, including exhibitions, performances, lectures, individual artist and department-generated projects, concerts, installations, and publications.

Listed below is a sample of projects supported by the CCA from 2001 to 2017.

Nov 04 - Nov 05 2011
Alloy Orchestra Returns!

Willard Straight Theatre
Alloy Orchestra Live Accompaniment

Cornell Cinema: The Alloy Orchestra has been creating original scores for restored silent films since the early ‘90s and have emerged as the best, and best-known, silent film accompanists in the world, each year premiering their latest work at the prestigious Telluride Film Festival.

November 4, 7:15 PM  Man With a Movie Camera (1929)
Dziga Vertov’s city symphony is a masterpiece of Soviet avant-garde cinema filled with breathtaking imagery. The film is non-stop excitement from start to finish, and the Alloy’s score for it is as beloved as their score for Metropolis.

November 4, 9 PM  Wild & Weird: 10 fascinating and innovative films, made between 1906 and 1927
Featuring an acrobatic fly, a clarinet-swallowing man, smoking fairies, a demonic magician, philandering insects and more!
A program of ten landmark early shorts – some favorites, others unfamiliar – produced between 1902 and 1927. Following Edwin S. Porter's curtain-raiser, Dream of the Rarebit Fiend from 1906, the program proceeds in chronological order with many of the shorts separated by vintage hand-painted slides created for use in movie theaters a century ago. The selections include Red Spectre, The Acrobatic Fly, The Thieving Hand, Princess Nicotine, Artheme Swallows His Clarinet, The Cameraman's Revenge, The Pet, Filmstudie, and The Life and Death of 9413, a Hollywood Extra.

November 5, 7:30 PM
From Morn to Midnight (1922)
This rediscovered and restored German Expressionist film received its U.S. premiere with the Alloy at the recent Telluride Film Festival, a performance the ensemble will reprise at the New York Film Festival before heading to Ithaca. According to festival programmers, "This stunning adaptation of Georg Kaiser’s play pushed the Expressionist stylization of sets, costumes and gestures introduced by The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (made a few months earlier) to such a radical point that German movie theaters refused to show it; long thought lost, a print was found and preserved by the National Film Center of Japan in the 1980s... Of special note is the bicycle race, surely one of the most amazing sequences in silent cinema.”
Image from Morn to Midnight

Tickets and information on Cornell Cinema Program for 2011-12